Publishing artifacts to Maven Central with Bintray & Gradle

Recently I joined a conversation on Twitter where the OP complained to spending hours to get a brand new computer setup to publish artifacts to Maven Central. The issue stemmed from having PGP signature files moved from one location to another. There are other issues that may arise when uploading artifacts to Maven Central, specially when doing it for the first time. The rules for publishing artifacts are stated here. A common mistake is to omit one of the required POM elements, which will likely trigger a series of back-and-forth revisions until you get it right. This can be frustrating Read More


Does Gradle need build profile support?

The need for customizing a build based on a particular environment is a prevalent one. Maven offers an option called build profiles which lets you customize certain aspects of the build but not all. However on the Gradle side of things, there’s no such feature found in core, with the argument being that contrasted to what Maven offers as means for defining build files (a limited XML based DSL), Gradle offers not one but two DSLs based on full programming languages. This allows developers use the same control flows they’re used to in production and test code but on build Read More


Announcing the Gradle Enforcer Plugin

Inspired by the popular Maven Enforcer plugin I’m happy to announce that its Gradle counterpart has been released, say hello to the enforcer-gradle-plugin! The behavior provided by Gradle Enforcer plugin is very similar to what the Maven Enforcer plugin provides, in the sense that rules will be executed during a particular phase of the build; any rule violations result in a build failure. Rules are typically setup to check for preconditions and requirements. The Maven Enforcer plugin provides a set of core rules and extra rules. In turn, the Gradle Enforcer plugin provides a similar set plus a few rules Read More


Configuring the OCI Gradle Build Cache plugin with GitHub Actions

Following up on the previous post that explains how to setup the OCI Gradle Build Cache plugin on Travis-CI today I’d like to show how to do the same with GitHub Actions. The steps to follow are quite similar; if you do not already have an OCI account and/or a configured compartment then please follow steps 1, 2, and 3 as explained in this post, then proceed with the next steps Step 4: Apply the plugin to your project Paste the following into your settings.gradle file Notice that the location of the config file is local to the project. There’s Read More


Configuring the OCI Gradle Build Cache plugin with Travis-ci

The following post describes how to configure the oci-gradle-build-cache plugin to write to the cache when running on Travis-ci. I’m assuming dear reader that you have an Oracle Cloud account ready, but if that were not to be the case then you can sign up for an Always Free tier account at https://www.oracle.com/cloud/free/. Let’s get started! Step 1: Create a config file There are a couple of ways to configure the plugin, we’ll use a configuration file whose format is specified at this page; you must gather the following information from your account tenancy id user id default home region Read More


Running Gradle inside Maven

As organizations evolve so do their codebases. Apache Maven and Gradle are the most popular and widely used build tools in the JVM. Usually multi-project builds rely on a single build tool to accomplish the job but there may be uses cases where you need to combine both, having Maven be the one leading the pack. One possible use case is to build a companion Gradle plugin, this is the case for ByteBuddy and Quarkus; another use case is to run a composite build with Maven and Gradle projects mixed together. In this post I’ll show how Gradle can be Read More


Composite builds with Maven and Gradle

Gradle offers a neat feature called “Composite Builds” which allows one project to consume artifacts from other builds as if they were part of a single coherent unit. This feature is pretty easy to setup, however you might not know that it’s possible to do the same with Maven. Here’s how. Let’s say you have a producer and consumer projects, where producer is set as a dependency on consumer. If these two projects are to have their own release lifecycles their file structure may look like this The contents of the Gradle build files look like so And in the Read More


Announcing oci-gradle-plugin version 0.1.0

The first release of the OCI Gradle Plugin is out! The plugin lets you interact with the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Java SDK. The behavior provided by OCI Java SDK is quite extensive, thus for this release the plugin delivers the minimal features required to setup and work with instances. Here’s an example, the following command will setup an Instance in a particular Compartment, while at the same time setting up a new VCN, Subnets, an InternetGateway and an InstanceConsoleConnection, allowing you to SSH to the freshly created instance $ ./gradlew setupInstance \ –compartment-id=ocid1.compartment.oc1…noa \ –instance-name=test \ –image=Oracle-Linux-7.6-2019.04.18-0 \ –shape=VM.Standard2.1 \ Read More


New features in Kordamp Gradle plugins

Version 0.14.0 of the Kordamp Gradle plugin suite is ready! This release brings a host of updates that should make your life easier when looking for gaining insights into your build. To begin with, all reporting tasks provided by the org.kordamp.gradle.base plugin will use ANSI colors if the terminal supports them. This make its easier to determine a particular setting, here’s for example the settings for the info and test (new) sections found in the alibaba/Sentinel project: The color code is as follows white: property names yellow: string literals cyan: numbers green: boolean, when true red: boolean, when false Speaking Read More


Building ThinWARs with Gradle

UPDATE: As it turns out the two POM files (javaee-api 8.0) (microprofile 1.3) consumed by the build files shown here are not real BOMs. A POM is considered a BOM if it defines a <dependencyManagement> block which neither of these files do. They are just regular POM files for which the regular dependency resolution mechanism works out of the box. This means there’s no strict requirement for building ThinWARs with Gradle 5.0, you can use earlier versions too. The Gradle build file has been updated to reflect this change however the screencast remains unchanged. Java Champion Adam Bien has advocated Read More


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