Gum 0.4.0 latest tricks

Gum 0.4.0 is out and it comes with a few goodies! If you’re like me you may see yourself switching between Maven and Gradle projects, a lot. This constant switching makes it very likely that I’ll mess up the command invocation and send Maven goals to a Gradle project, or send Gradle tasks to a Maven project. This results in a wasted JVM iteration as the command fails. But what if there was a way to make it work given certain mappings? What if Maven’s compile goal could be translated into Gradle’s classes or viceversa? What if these mappings were Read More


Declarative Gradle builds, is it possible?

I’ve been thinking about 100% declarative Gradle builds for quite some time now. As of June 2020 Gradle offers not one but two different DSLs based on programming languages (Groovy and Kotlin) for defining the steps that the build should take to do its thing. For years developers were used to adding whatever code was “necessary” to make the build turn its gears, regardless of the consequences. In recent times the push has been to move those pieces of code into plugins, simplifying the build files themselves, and also promising less actual code in the build files. Yet, one can Read More


Jumping into Go

I finally did it. I jumped into Go and I like it. Many years ago (7 or so?) a dear friend of mine told me about Go and that I should give it a try. He did warn me that the language felt like Java of the olden days, back when Java was 1.0, but despite this Go was a pretty good language. I did give Go a try a few times in the past, even presented a couple of times (at work and abroad) about the similarities and differences between Java and Go from a Java developer’s POV, yet Read More


Gum: the Gradle/Maven wrapper

I’m happy to announce the immediate availability of Gum, a Gradle/Maven wrapper written in Go. Gum is inspired on the popular gdub script by Doug Borg, which was ported to Go by Sten Roger Sandvik some time ago. The main difference from Sten’s version is that Gum also supports the Maven wrapper, coming up as part of Maven core 3.7! The basic idea behind Gum is to prefer the tool wrapper over the plain tool, if the wrapper is configured. It also allows you invoke the build tool from any place withing the project’s codebase. There are a few additions Read More


Publishing artifacts to Maven Central with Bintray & Gradle

Recently I joined a conversation on Twitter where the OP complained to spending hours to get a brand new computer setup to publish artifacts to Maven Central. The issue stemmed from having PGP signature files moved from one location to another. There are other issues that may arise when uploading artifacts to Maven Central, specially when doing it for the first time. The rules for publishing artifacts are stated here. A common mistake is to omit one of the required POM elements, which will likely trigger a series of back-and-forth revisions until you get it right. This can be frustrating Read More


Does Gradle need build profile support?

The need for customizing a build based on a particular environment is a prevalent one. Maven offers an option called build profiles which lets you customize certain aspects of the build but not all. However on the Gradle side of things, there’s no such feature found in core, with the argument being that contrasted to what Maven offers as means for defining build files (a limited XML based DSL), Gradle offers not one but two DSLs based on full programming languages. This allows developers use the same control flows they’re used to in production and test code but on build Read More


Announcing the PomChecker project

I’m happy to announce the immediate availability of the PomChecker suite! What is it you ask? It’s a small set of utilities to verify that a POM or BOM file complies with the minimum requirements for being uploaded to Maven Central. I wish an utility like this existed years ago when I started publishing artifacts to Maven Central. It took me a few tries in the beginning to get the POM files just right. Recently I’ve seen other developers struggling with these rules as well. Hopefully these utilities can help them and others get on the road much faster. There Read More


Detecting duplicate dependencies in Maven

In late March 2020 I ran a quiz on Maven Dependency Resolution which turned out to be an eye opener for some people (including myself!). You can read the whole questionnaire, results, and analysis here. One of the surprising results was found in the very first question, a rather innocuous one but it resulted in a major stumbling block for 2/3 of respondents! Here’s the question What’s surprising is that only 36% people chose the correct answer and a similar percentage chose the “Build error” option because clearly duplicate dependencies ought to cause a build error, right? Wrong! Maven does Read More


Announcing the Gradle Enforcer Plugin

Inspired by the popular Maven Enforcer plugin I’m happy to announce that its Gradle counterpart has been released, say hello to the enforcer-gradle-plugin! The behavior provided by Gradle Enforcer plugin is very similar to what the Maven Enforcer plugin provides, in the sense that rules will be executed during a particular phase of the build; any rule violations result in a build failure. Rules are typically setup to check for preconditions and requirements. The Maven Enforcer plugin provides a set of core rules and extra rules. In turn, the Gradle Enforcer plugin provides a similar set plus a few rules Read More


Configuring the OCI Gradle Build Cache plugin with GitHub Actions

Following up on the previous post that explains how to setup the OCI Gradle Build Cache plugin on Travis-CI today I’d like to show how to do the same with GitHub Actions. The steps to follow are quite similar; if you do not already have an OCI account and/or a configured compartment then please follow steps 1, 2, and 3 as explained in this post, then proceed with the next steps Step 4: Apply the plugin to your project Paste the following into your settings.gradle file Notice that the location of the config file is local to the project. There’s Read More


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