5 Gradle plugins for working with modular Java projects

Java 9 was release in September 2017 and with it came a brand new modular platform known as JPMS, delivered by Project Jigsaw. Building projects that an leverage this new feature can be a bit daunting however the Gradle plugins in the following list can help you in keeping things under control. 1. JDeps – https://github.com/aalmiray/jdeps-gradle-plugin This plugin generates a report of your production code and compile/runtime dependencies using the jdeps tool available since Java 8. Jdeps can tell you if your codebase is vulnerable to API changes such as relying on internal APIs (like sun.misc.Unsafe) even if you don’t Read More


The Gradle SuperPOM

Following up with the Gradle POM, where a familiar structure found in Maven projects can be brought to Gradle projects, I’d like to discuss another Maven feature that many see as an advantage and that’s lacking in Gradle: the ability to enforce settings in a top-down fashion with hierarchical POM files. In Maven, a parent POM delivers configuration that will be used by a child POM as is. Children POMs have the option to override and extend these properties. A typical use case in parent POMs is to provide <pluginManagement> and <dependencyManagement> sections; they also configure default dependencies, properties, plugins, Read More


The Gradle POM

Gradle is an extensible and very flexible build tool capable of building projects that target many platforms, not just Java. In the Java space it’s often compared to Apache Maven; one of the often cited complains against Gradle is that it’s “too complicated” or rather “too flexible” when compared to Apache Maven. It appears a large percentage of Maven users do love having a fixed structure that restricts the amount of havoc a junior developer may bring to the project if he or she desires to play with the build file. However this fixed structure also restricts power users from Read More


An opinionated way to build Gradle projects

If given a choice I’d pick Gradle over Maven as build tool 9 times out of 10. Gradle is a very extensible tool which has allowed me to customize my builds exactly how I want them to be, however this flexibility comes at a price as there’s a lot of configuration that has to applied to make a project follow a certain structure. Let’s say you’ve created a project and release it as Open Source. You’d typically post a release to Maven Central which requires following these guidelines, which include A well defined POM file. Attach a sources JAR. Attach Read More


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